Quick Answer: What temperature do I cook fudge to?

Confectionery experiments have shown that the ideal cooking temperature for fudge is around 114 to 115 °C (237 to 239 °F). The cooking is intended to evaporate a part of the liquid and concentrate the sugar. The temperature of the cream/sugar mixture (called syrup) rises as water evaporates.

How long should you boil fudge?

Determining when the fudge is done.

Start checking the fudge for doneness after 10 minutes of boiling. If you are using a thermometer, your fudge is ready when it reaches 235°F.

Can you overcook fudge?

Under- or overcooking the sugar

The amount of time you cook fudge directly affects its firmness. Too little time and the water won’t evaporate, causing the fudge to be soft. Conversely, cook it too long and fudge won’t contain enough water, making it hard with a dry, crumbly texture.

How long do you boil fudge to get to soft ball stage?

Combine sugar and milk in a small pot and cook over medium high heat. Stir continuously while the mixture boils for about 10 minutes. After 10 minutes of boiling, check to see if the ‘soft ball stage’ has occurred.

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What is the secret to perfect fudge?

The trick to good homemade fudge is to cook the ingredients to the right temperature to form a sugar syrup, and cool the mixture properly so the texture of the fudge turns out smooth and firm, but soft enough to cut.

How do you know when fudge is ready?

Use a candy thermometer or conduct a cold water test to check if the fudge is done. Do not rely on the cooking time indicated in your recipe. The fudge is ready when a candy thermometer reads between 112 to 114 °C (234 to 237 °F) or the mixture forms a soft ball in cold water. Let the mixture cool before beating.

Why has my fudge turned to caramel?

So, why did my fudge turn out more like caramel? Fudge often turns into a chewy caramel-like texture because incorrect temperatures were reached. The ideal temperature for the fudge to cook at is 232-234°F (111-112°C). Anything more or less will change the texture completely.

Why is my fudge gooey?

Sometimes old-fashioned fudge never sets, even after hours in the refrigerator. You wait patiently, only to discover that it’s still a sticky, gummy mess. … Fudge usually behaves this way when it’s not cooked to a high enough temperature (due to oversight or a faulty candy thermometer).

What causes fudge not to harden?

The sugar in your fudge mixture should be able to pass the soft ball test: a drop of the melted sugar dropped into cold water should form a soft ball rather than dissolve. … Cooling is one of the most crucial steps in making fudge, and improper cooling can be the culprit behind fudge that will not set or harden properly.

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Do you need a sugar thermometer to make fudge?

You don’t need a candy thermometer to make your favorite sweets. … Once the candy reaches the desired stage (for example, the hard-ball stage for marshmallows), take the pot off the heat and proceed with the recipe. Example: According to a fudge recipe, your boiling sugar must reach 236 F, the soft-ball stage.

How do you know when fudge is done without a thermometer?

Skill level. To check your sugar syrup has reached the correct stage without using a sugar thermometer, place a bowl of very cold water next to the hob. Using a clean spoon, carefully take a little of the syrup and drop it into the bowl of cold water. Leave to cool for a moment then pick up the ball of syrup.

How long should fudge cool before cutting?

Cool the fudge for 50 to 70 minutes until the temperature registers 110 degrees on the candy thermometer and the bottom of the pot feels lukewarm to the touch. Do not disturb the fudge during the cooling process. 2. Using a wooden spoon, stir in the vanilla.

Should I use a double boiler for fudge?

How do you make homemade fudge? Fudge is made by using a double boiler to melt the chocolate and incorporate the rest of the ingredients. It’s important that you keep the heat at a simmer otherwise you risk overheating the chocolate and burning it.